OISIN’S MOTHER (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

CHAPTER I EVENING was drawing nigh, and the Fianna-Finn had decided to hunt no more that day. The hounds were whistled to heel, and a sober, homeward march began. For men will walk soberly in the evening, however they go in the day, and dogs will take the mood from their masters. They were pacing…

THE BOYHOOD OF FIONN (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

He was a king, a seer and a poet. He was a lord with a manifold and great train. He was our magician, our knowledgable one, our soothsayer. All that he did was sweet with him. And, however ye deem my testimony of Fionn excessive, and, although ye hold my praising overstrained, nevertheless, and by…

THE BIRTH OF BRAN (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

CHAPTER I There are people who do not like dogs a bit—they are usually women—but in this story there is a man who did not like dogs. In fact, he hated them. When he saw one he used to go black in the face, and he threw rocks at it until it got out of…

THE STORY OF TUAN MAC CAIRILL (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

“A powerful person!” said Finnian. “All that,” was the reply. “We shall try this person’s power,” said Finnian. “He is reputed to be a wise and hardy man,” said his informant. “We shall test his wisdom and his hardihood.” “He is,” that gossip whispered—“he is a magician.” “I will magician him,” cried Finnian angrily. “Where…