MONGAN’S FRENZY (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

CHAPTER I The abbot of the Monastery of Moville sent word to the story-tellers of Ireland that when they were in his neighbourhood they should call at the monastery, for he wished to collect and write down the stories which were in danger of being forgotten. “These things also must be told,” said he. In…

BECUMA OF THE WHITE SKIN (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

CHAPTER I There are more worlds than one, and in many ways they are unlike each other. But joy and sorrow, or, in other words, good and evil, are not absent in their degree from any of the worlds, for wherever there is life there is action, and action is but the expression of one…

THE CARL OF THE DRAB COAT (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

CHAPTER I One day something happened to Fionn, the son of Uail; that is, he departed from the world of men, and was set wandering in great distress of mind through Faery. He had days and nights there and adventures there, and was able to bring back the memory of these. That, by itself, is…

THE LITTLE BRAWL AT ALLEN (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

CHAPTER I “I think,” said Cairell Whiteskin, “that although judgement was given against Fionn, it was Fionn had the rights of it.” “He had eleven hundred killed,” said Cona’n amiably, “and you may call that the rights of it if you like.” “All the same—” Cairell began argumentatively. “And it was you that commenced it,”…

THE WOOING OF BECFOLA (IRISH FAIRY TALES) by James Stephens

CHAPTER I We do not know where Becfola came from. Nor do we know for certain where she went to. We do not even know her real name, for the name Becfola, “Dowerless” or “Small-dowered,” was given to her as a nickname. This only is certain, that she disappeared from the world we know of,…