CLEMATIS (PICCANINNIES BY ISABEL MAUD PEACOCKE)

f course fashions change, and no one need be surprised to find that crimson kilts were soon “out,” while the Piccaninny girls were to be seen walking about in pretty little white, frilly petticoats made out of clematis blossoms, and sun hats of the same flowers. The hats were rather silly, because the Piccaninnies lived…

The Salt Merchant and His Ass (Aesop’s fables) by Aesop

A PEDDLER drove his Ass to the seashore to buy salt. His road home lay across a stream into which his Ass, making a false step, fell by accident and rose up again with his load considerably lighter, as the water melted the sack. The Peddler retraced his steps and refilled his panniers with a…

PICCANINNIES BY ISABEL MAUD PEACOCKE

PICCANINNIES If your heart is pure, and your eyes are clear, And you come the one right day of the year, And eat of the fruit of the Magic Tree The wee Bush Folk you will surely see. In the green and woody places, Thickets shady, sunlit spaces, Have you never heard us calling, When…

The Sick Stag (Aesop’s fables) by Aesop

A SICK STAG lay down in a quiet corner of its pasture-ground. His companions came in great numbers to inquire after his health, and each one helped himself to a share of the food which had been placed for his use; so that he died, not from his sickness, but from the failure of the…

The Boys and the Frogs (Aesop’s fables) by Aesop

SOME BOYS, playing near a pond, saw a number of Frogs in the water and began to pelt them with stones. They killed several of them, when one of the Frogs, lifting his head out of the water, cried out: “Pray stop, my boys: what is sport to you, is death to us.” If you…