The Death Card by Helene Munson (2019)

The death card appeared again and again. The Tarot spreads were inauspicious. But I was determined to go on my epic African adventure, overland from Nairobi to Cape Town. Months of planning and saving had gone into it.  I had found a Maasai village homestay, paid a deposit for a room at a family home…

Top 5 Stories about “The Hare”

In folk and fairy tales around the world the hare is portrayed as a cunning and clever character. Sometimes, as far as I know, especially in African stories, his wittiness is mixed with a vicious deceitfulness (like in “The hare and the quail” or “Sympathy killed Mr. Kapangula” on malamusi.com. Without further ado, here are…

HOHERIA BLOSSOM (PICCANINNIES BY ISABEL MAUD PEACOCKE)

Do you know the Lovely Ladies of the Bush? They swing on the tips of the Hoheria tree, with their floating white gowns and tossing silvery ringlets, and are so light and graceful that they float on the wind as they swing. If you could only see the Lovely Ladies dancing! But very few have been lucky…

Bush Babies – KOWHAI BLOSSOM (PICCANINNIES BY ISABEL MAUD PEACOCKE)

The Bush Babies lieIn cradles of gold;They haven’t a stitch,But they never take cold;For the golden flowers,And the golden sun,And the golden smilesUpon everyone—Keep the world warm and brightAnd flooded with lightFor the Bush BabiesIn their cradles of gold. The Bush Babies come out of the kowhai flowers. They are the prettiest little things—fair as…

TEA TREE (PICCANINNIES BY ISABEL MAUD PEACOCKE)

One of the Piccaninnies had a horrid adventure one day. He had heard a tui that morning singing in the Bush, and had made up his mind to speak to it, because he was sulking with the other Piccaninnies. You know they say a tui can be made to talk, but it’s hard to get…

Marya Morevna (Russian Fairy Tales) by W. R. S. RALSTON

In a certain kingdom there lived a Prince Ivan. He had three sisters. The first was the Princess Marya, the second the Princess Olga, the third the Princess Anna. When their father and mother lay at the point of death, they had thus enjoined their son:—“Give your sisters in marriage to the very first suitors…

The Fox Who Had Lost His Tail (Aesop’s fables) by Aesop

A FOX caught in a trap escaped, but in so doing lost his tail. Thereafter, feeling his life a burden from the shame and ridicule to which he was exposed, he schemed to convince all the other Foxes that being tailless was much more attractive, thus making up for his own deprivation. He assembled a…