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THE STONES OF FIVE COLORS AND THE EMPRESS JOKWA – AN OLD CHINESE STORY (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

THE STONES OF FIVE COLORS AND THE EMPRESS JOKWA – AN OLD CHINESE STORY (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

Long, long ago there lived a great Chinese Empress who succeeded her brother the Emperor Fuki. It was the age of giants, and the Empress Jokwa, for that was her name, was twenty-five feet high, nearly as tall as her brother. She was a wonderful woman, and an able ruler. There is an interesting story of how she mended a part of the broken heavens and one of the terrestrial pillars which upheld the sky, both of which were damaged during a rebellion raised by one of King Fuki’s subjects. The rebel’s name was Kokai. He was twenty-six feet high....

HOW AN OLD MAN LOST HIS WEN (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

HOW AN OLD MAN LOST HIS WEN (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

Many, many years ago there lived a good old man who had a wen like a tennis-ball growing out of his right cheek. This lump was a great disfigurement to the old man, and so annoyed him that for many years he spent all his time and money in trying to get rid of it. He tried everything he could think of. He consulted many doctors far and near, and took all kinds of medicines both internally and externally. But it was all of no use. The lump only grew bigger and bigger till it was nearly as big as...

THE OGRE OF RASHOMON (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

Long, long ago in Kyoto, the people of the city were terrified by accounts of a dreadful ogre, who, it was said, haunted the Gate of Rashomon at twilight and seized whoever passed by. The missing victims were never seen again, so it was whispered that the ogre was a horrible cannibal, who not only killed the unhappy victims but ate them also. Now everybody in the town and neighborhood was in great fear, and no one durst venture out after sunset near the Gate of Rashomon. Now at this time there lived in Kyoto a general named Raiko, who...

MOMOTARO, OR THE STORY OF THE SON OF A PEACH  (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

MOMOTARO, OR THE STORY OF THE SON OF A PEACH (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

Long, long ago there lived, an old man and an old woman; they were peasants, and had to work hard to earn their daily rice. The old man used to go and cut grass for the farmers around, and while he was gone the old woman, his wife, did the work of the house and worked in their own little rice field. One day the old man went to the hills as usual to cut grass and the old woman took some clothes to the river to wash. It was nearly summer, and the country was very beautiful to see...

THE STORY OF PRINCE YAMATO TAKE (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

THE STORY OF PRINCE YAMATO TAKE (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

The insignia of the great Japanese Empire is composed of three treasures which have been considered sacred, and guarded with jealous care from time immemorial. These are the Yatano-no-Kagami or the Mirror of Yata, the Yasakami-no-Magatama or the Jewel of Yasakami, and the Murakumo-no-Tsurugi or the Sword of Murakumo. Of these three treasures of the Empire, the sword of Murakumo, afterwards known as Kusanagi-no-Tsrugugi, or the grass-cleaving sword, is considered the most precious and most highly to be honored, for it is the symbol of strength to this nation of warriors and the talisman of invincibility for the Emperor, while...

THE WHITE HARE AND THE CROCODILES (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

THE WHITE HARE AND THE CROCODILES (Tales of Old Japan) by YEI THEODORA OZAKI

Long, long ago, when all the animals could talk, there lived in the province of Inaba in Japan, a little white hare. His home was on the island of Oki, and just across the sea was the mainland of Inaba. Now the hare wanted very much to cross over to Inaba. Day after day he would go out and sit on the shore and look longingly over the water in the direction of Inaba, and day after day he hoped to find some way of getting across. One day as usual, the hare was standing on the beach, looking towards...